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Certificates (and badges) in university teaching and learning

This is a program we launched in Fall 2017, to coordinate programming offered by the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning for graduate students who are interested in developing expertise in university teaching and learning. It’s run on the badges.ucalgary.ca platform built by my team (go, team!), as well as D2L courses for online content […]

This is a program we launched in Fall 2017, to coordinate programming offered by the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning for graduate students who are interested in developing expertise in university teaching and learning. It’s run on the badges.ucalgary.ca platform built by my team (go, team!), as well as D2L courses for online content and discussion. As grad students work through the program, they earn badges for completing a set of workshops or sessions in an area of focus: (My team works with our Learning and Instructional Design team to offer sessions in the Learning Spaces & Digital Pedagogies badge.) If a grad student works through all of the badges over a year or 2, they earn the full certificate, which is a recognized credential. It’s a great, low-stakes way to scaffold grad students as they build expertise in teaching as part of their career as students at UCalgary. The narrative of teaching development in higher education is often “nobody ever thinks of grad students. ever!”. Here’s an example of what happens when a university values teaching, and an entire Institute mobilizes to develop robust and sustained programming for graduate students to develop into great teachers. Next, instructors and faculty members…  

The Teaching Challenge

The Teaching Challenge is a website built by the team at the Taylor Institute, partially inspired by the DS106 Daily Create. The goal is to provide a platform – scaffolding – to give instructors concrete projects to try in their courses. Projects can range from … Continue readingThe Teaching Challenge

The Teaching Challenge is a website built by the team at the Taylor Institute, partially inspired by the DS106 Daily Create. The goal is to provide a platform – scaffolding – to give instructors concrete projects to try in their courses. Projects can range from building some media – make a video – to more complicated things like incorporating active learning. Participants post reflections on what they’ve tried, how it worked, and share with the community. Some very cool stuff. It’s started basically as a skunkworks prototype, but is growing to become a foundation of how we do things. I believe this forms an important way for people to take risks and try new things – and, when combined with Badges and ePortfolio, provides a meaningful way to document and develop growth as a teacher.
Organized by the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning, the Teaching Challenge is a community hub, offering a series of online activities that serve as prompts for educators to explore techniques and to gather feedback from peers, connecting an interdisciplinary community of educators. Geared towards an interest in innovative teaching and learning methods, the initiative’s “challenges” range from incorporating student reflective writing exercises to creating podcasts or screencasts for classroom use. and The Teaching Challenge has also had a positive impact on Andrea Freeman’s career as an instructor. “Lifelong learning is about more than just increasing knowledge,” she emphasizes. “It is about becoming the best you can be. This type of peer-to-peer sharing provides insight that cannot be obtained from teaching evaluations and reinforces excellent teaching strategies. I came to the University with a strong research focus, but teaching is so much a part of our lives and the future of the University. The Teaching Challenge is a simple way for me to find better ways of engaging my students, so that I can be a more effective contributor to learning on this campus.”

Source: The Teaching Challenge I’m really proud of how this project was built – collaboration across the Learning Technologies and Learning and Instructional Design Groups, from concept through software development and prototyping, and integration with existing and emerging programs. Very cool stuff. We’re also using it as a foundation of the Taylor Institute’s new Graduate Student Certificate in University Teaching and Learning, to guide participants through the Learning Spaces and Digital Pedagogy badge (which also uses our badges.ucalgary.ca platform… I love it when a plan comes together…)

The Teaching Challenge

The Teaching Challenge is a website built by the team at the Taylor Institute, partially inspired by the DS106 Daily Create. The goal is to provide a platform – scaffolding – to give instructors concrete projects to try in their courses. Projects can range from … Continue readingThe Teaching Challenge

The Teaching Challenge is a website built by the team at the Taylor Institute, partially inspired by the DS106 Daily Create. The goal is to provide a platform – scaffolding – to give instructors concrete projects to try in their courses. Projects can range from building some media – make a video – to more complicated things like incorporating active learning. Participants post reflections on what they’ve tried, how it worked, and share with the community. Some very cool stuff. It’s started basically as a skunkworks prototype, but is growing to become a foundation of how we do things. I believe this forms an important way for people to take risks and try new things – and, when combined with Badges and ePortfolio, provides a meaningful way to document and develop growth as a teacher.
Organized by the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning, the Teaching Challenge is a community hub, offering a series of online activities that serve as prompts for educators to explore techniques and to gather feedback from peers, connecting an interdisciplinary community of educators. Geared towards an interest in innovative teaching and learning methods, the initiative’s “challenges” range from incorporating student reflective writing exercises to creating podcasts or screencasts for classroom use. and The Teaching Challenge has also had a positive impact on Andrea Freeman’s career as an instructor. “Lifelong learning is about more than just increasing knowledge,” she emphasizes. “It is about becoming the best you can be. This type of peer-to-peer sharing provides insight that cannot be obtained from teaching evaluations and reinforces excellent teaching strategies. I came to the University with a strong research focus, but teaching is so much a part of our lives and the future of the University. The Teaching Challenge is a simple way for me to find better ways of engaging my students, so that I can be a more effective contributor to learning on this campus.”

Source: The Teaching Challenge I’m really proud of how this project was built – collaboration across the Learning Technologies and Learning and Instructional Design Groups, from concept through software development and prototyping, and integration with existing and emerging programs. Very cool stuff. We’re also using it as a foundation of the Taylor Institute’s new Graduate Student Certificate in University Teaching and Learning, to guide participants through the Learning Spaces and Digital Pedagogy badge (which also uses our badges.ucalgary.ca platform… I love it when a plan comes together…)

We’re hiring – Learning Technologies Project Assistant

I’m hoping to add a grad or senior undergrad student to the Learning Technologies Group. This position will work closely with other members of the team, and will get to work directly with instructors who are teaching face-to-face, blended, or online courses as they integrate various learning technologies. Like consulting and collaborating with instructors who […]

I’m hoping to add a grad or senior undergrad student to the Learning Technologies Group. This position will work closely with other members of the team, and will get to work directly with instructors who are teaching face-to-face, blended, or online courses as they integrate various learning technologies. Like consulting and collaborating with instructors who are doing cool things in their courses? Like working with people from all 13 faculties and with people in key departments across campus (including, of course, the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning, Information Technologies, and Libraries and Cultural Resources)? Check out the TI’s Job Opportunities page (or the full job description) and apply before Oct. 6, 2017. It’s a really fun team, working with really amazing people from across the university.

OER Pilot at UCalgary

We threw the switch this morning, launching the OER pilot program. It’s a small-scale initiative, intended to support the integration of open textbooks into 10 courses within the 2017/2018 academic year. There are two branches – faculty advocacy, and project implementation. The implementation is being let by my team at the Taylor Institute, working with […]

We threw the switch this morning, launching the OER pilot program. It’s a small-scale initiative, intended to support the integration of open textbooks into 10 courses within the 2017/2018 academic year. There are two branches – faculty advocacy, and project implementation. The implementation is being let by my team at the Taylor Institute, working with the University of Calgary’s OER Faculty Advocate and his team. We’ll be hiring a graduate student to act as a research assistant for the program, who will help coordinate the various projects – hopefully 10 concurrent projects with instructors working with up to 20 undergraduate students to identify good candidate resources for use in a course, which will be reviewed by a graduate student (and the instructor) before being integrated into the course. The pilot has been designed to give full autonomy to the instructors – they have to opt into the program, and they will be working directly with the students as much as they’d like to discover and review potential OER and open textbook candidates. More info about how the program will run is available on the website, as well as the application form for instructors to sign up to participate. This first pilot program is entirely focused on adopting existing open textbooks – ideally, as a “simple” replacement of commercial resources within a course. We may be exploring adopting and authoring in subsequent stages of the program, but to start we need to keep things simple. I’ll post info to the open.ucalgary.ca website once we’ve got the 10 projects selected, with updates as the open textbooks are integrated into the courses.

Lessons learned: living with digital media systems in flexible classrooms

The Taylor Institute’s AV systems were designed to be incredibly flexible, able to adapt to changing requirements between (or even during) classes. That meant shifting from hardwired analog systems to fully digital media management to allow for software-controlled mixing and switching of signals. What people assume, when they walk into a classroom, is something basically …

Continue reading “Lessons learned: living with digital media systems in flexible classrooms”

The Taylor Institute’s AV systems were designed to be incredibly flexible, able to adapt to changing requirements between (or even during) classes. That meant shifting from hardwired analog systems to fully digital media management to allow for software-controlled mixing and switching of signals. What people assume, when they walk into a classroom, is something basically like this: You show up, plug your laptop in, and it sends stuff to the projector. And other stuff to the speakers. Simple. What we have is more like this: That’s an extremely oversimplified representation of the flow. There are many many many steps not shown. This kind of design allows instructors and students to have an incredible level of control over the media in the active learning classroom. They can push a button in the software running on the Crestron panel on the podium, and route images and audio from about a dozen input sources to about that many outputs. When it works, it’s absolutely amazing, and it feels like living in a science fiction classroom of the future. When something goes wrong, however, it can be an incredibly frustrating exercise in troubleshooting. Any of a few dozen steps between input and output could have gone awry.  Often, troubleshooting these steps involves running to the separate IT floor (most of the audiovisual gear is installed on “mezzanine” floor, making it possible to work on the equipment without disrupting classes, but making troubleshooting during classes a bit of a pain because the gear isn’t physically in the room) and doing the emergency turn-it-off-and-back-on thing. We had some fun on Friday, when the audio systems in the Forum stopped sending audio to the speakers at the beginning of a 2-hour class that was designed to rely on the microphones (audio), videos on the instructor’s laptop (audio), and a blu-ray movie (audio). So, three strikes right off the top. There had been a firmware update on a network switch a couple of weeks ago, and that apparently caused a problem that exposed a bug in the audio management software. Something about packet corruption, and network data being interpreted as audio and then being dutifully sent to the speakers. Which led to some incredibly loud moments as the giant speakers suddenly maxed out with white noise during a class. Not ideal. Thankfully, we have a great relationship with the company that installed and configured the systems, and they sent their senior tech to try to troubleshoot (while the class was still in session – rapid response times!). After some serious head-scratching, he talked to one of the vendors and determined that it was a bug in the audio management software, and that there was a beta version of the software that solved that particular bug. So, he installed the beta (on our only production audio management hardware – what could go wrong?) and the problem went away. For now. Thankfully.

Katarina Mårtensson keynote – Significant conversations in academic microcultures

Dr. Mårtensson‘s research formed much of the foundation of the plan for the Taylor Institute. Specifically, the macro/meso/micro layers within an organization, and working with each layer in various ways to draw people into the community. Her keynote at the 2017 University of Calgary Conference on Post-secondary Learning and Teaching was great, and nicely connected many …

Continue reading “Katarina Mårtensson keynote – Significant conversations in academic microcultures”

Dr. Mårtensson‘s research formed much of the foundation of the plan for the Taylor Institute. Specifically, the macro/meso/micro layers within an organization, and working with each layer in various ways to draw people into the community. Her keynote at the 2017 University of Calgary Conference on Post-secondary Learning and Teaching was great, and nicely connected many of the threads of the conference.